Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

   Note: The questions in this FAQ assume the perspective of participating organisations. Any mention of 'you' in questions therefore refers to EffectiveGiving.Asia and its team, while mentions of 'we' in questions refer to participating organisations.

 

Note: The questions in this FAQ assume the perspective of participating organisations. Any mention of 'you' in questions therefore refers to EffectiveGiving.Asia and its team, while mentions of 'we' in questions refer to participating organisations.


Who are you?

At EffectiveGiving.Asia, we are working on identifying effective charities in Southeast Asia (SEA) that combat malnutrition or improve access to water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH). By doing this, we hope to find some of the best giving opportunities in the region.

To find out more about the team behind EffectiveGiving.Asia, see our About Us page.


Which countries are you looking at in Southeast Asia? 

Southeast Asia consists of Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, Myanmar, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Timor-Leste, Brunei and the Philippines. For now, we are focusing our efforts on charities in low and lower-middle income SEA countries that are working on (i) improving mother and child malnutrition and (ii) improving access to WASH.


Why is your focus on malnutrition / WASH? 

Our research has revealed that malnutrition and WASH are one of the most cost-effective target areas for saving lives in SEA. Malnutrition and lack of access to WASH have contributed to significant public health problems in SEA, most notably a high rate of stunting. Research carried out by UNICEF, WHO and the World Bank reveal that 25.8% of children under five in Southeast Asia are stunted.1 This means that the physical and cognitive growth of a significant number of children in the region are compromised. Many children also die as a direct result of being malnourished.

Furthermore, stunting compromises not only the welfare of affected individuals, but also the economic performance of nations. Economists estimate that Asian countries can attribute up to an 11% loss of gross domestic product (GDP) to malnutrition.2

Studies have proven that there are simple yet effective interventions which improve access to nutrition and WASH, as well as reduce the disease burden associated with malnutrition and poor WASH facilities. Giving to effective charities working in these areas would therefore be one of the most cost-effective ways of saving lives and reducing suffering in the region.

1: UNICEF / WHO / World Bank Group Joint Child Malnutrition Estimates. Key findings of the 2017 edition: http://www.who.int/nutgrowthdb/jme_brochoure2017.pdf?ua=1

2: Horton S. & Steckel R. (2013) Global economic losses attributable to malnutrition 1900–2000 and projections to 2050. In: The Economics of Human Challenges (ed. B. Lomborg). Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, U.K.


Why should we participate in this project?

We aim to publish a report highlighting effective charities in SEA targetting malnutrition and WASH at the end of this project. This report will enable prospective donors to better understand the work that select charities engage in and thereby encourage them to offer their financial support.

By participating in this project, you will give us a better understanding of the work that you do. Your charity will also have the opportunity to be chosen as one of our featured charities and to expand your donor base. 


What is your process of evaluation?

1. Form

  • We will first need a representative from your organisation to fill in a simple form. This form will give us a better understanding of your organisation and its operations.

2. Interview and Follow-up

  • If we find that your charity is a good fit for this project, we will conduct an email or Skype interview with a representative from your charity. This stage of the process will allow you to expand upon the information provided earlier on in the form and enable us to ask more questions. We also foresee following up with you after the interview to raise any clarifications. 

3. Submission of Documents and Follow-up

  • Lastly, we might request that you share monitoring and evaluation documents relating to the operation and implementation of your programs. Having these documents will give us a more detailed picture of your work.

To find out more about our evaluation process, see our Charity Evaluation page.  


How much of our time will this evaluation take?

Your time commitment to this project will depend on how many stages of evaluation your charity undergoes. We estimate that the first stage will require no more than 15 minutes of your time. The second stage of interviews and follow-up clarifications might require 2 - 6 hours of your time and the third stage of document submission might require an additional 2 - 6 hours of your time.

We understand that your time is valuable and will seek to make good use of it.


What will you do with the information collected? / Will the information collected be publicly shared?

Any information collected through our evaluations will not be shared without your consent. However, we do aim to publish a report highlighting effective charities in Southeast Asia at the end of this project. If your charity is selected, we will seek your permission to publish what you have previously disclosed to us.

Sharing more about your operations will give prospective donors a better understanding of the work you engage in and might inspire them to offer their support. We firmly believe that transparency on a charity's part is important because informed donors not only give more, but give with more confidence. 


Who should represent our charity for this evaluation?

We recommend choosing a representative with a good understanding of your charity’s operations. Representatives should know about the programmes funded and run by your charity, as well as your financial strategy.


Who funds this project?

We are funded by Croeni Foundation’s Impact Fellowship and philanthropist Simon Flint.

To find out more about our funders, see Croeni Foundation’s website and this interview with Simon Flint.    


If you have any questions that are not addressed here, feel free to contact us.